Truper 72″ Pencil Point San Angelo Bar

I was cleaning up my yard and found it one hell of a job trying to dig out roots and rocks. Eventually I found a quick way of cutting out roots by using my reciprocating saw. I picked up the San Angelo Bar, not sure where the roots of that name came from, perhaps from the country of origin?  It’s about 16 lbs with a pencil point tip.  Literally this thing could pierce a hole through a sheet of metal with the weight and pointed tip.

Japanese Maple Red-Leaf

Japanese Maples are a sophisticated addition to any home landscape. With their delicate fern-like foliage, beautiful fall color and striking winter form they are a must-have!

Acer palmatum garnet – red weeping Japanese maple grows up to 10 feet in height. Very fast growing when young, it will look two years older than most A. palmatums the same age. To bring out the red-orange color in the leaves, this maple will need some sun. Plant this to cascade down a wall or in a large container.

Boxwoods

I picked up 5 boxwoods today to plant infront of my home.  They were fairly inexpensive, but probably because they were only about 8″ high.  It will take some time for them to get to a reasonable height so it can provide some privacy in the front yard.  The hope is to have them grow and trim them so they can have a creative shape.  I have seen some really nice landscaping where they have made very creative shapes and representative animals.  I’ll leave them alone till after fall/winter and look to see if they need any trimming during the spring.

My Money Tree

I decided to add some ‘life’ and possibly luck of fortunes with a money tree.  I found this 10″ money tree amongst all the others, and felt like this was the one for me.  The species used for a money tree plant is formally known as Pachira aquatica.  It is native to swamp lands in South America.  The plant itself is already considered to be fortunate by followers of feng shui, because of its five lobed palmate leaves. A money tree plant with leaves in clusters of seven, another powerful number, is considered to be especially lucky. The leaves of the money tree plant are edible, along with the flowers and nuts that it forms. The lucky trees can often be found in powerful places in the home, because plants and living things are supposed to be good for feng shui.

I decided to pick up a new pot for the plant.  Just a regular plastic pot with a dish to catch any leaking.  What I did to make the pot seem a bit more vibrant/modern was to pick up some spray paint from Home Depot and sprayed it the color of rust/copper.  It turned out alright.  The challenge was to repot the plant.  There was some left over gravel in the garage and put it at the base of the pot to help the soil breath, and filled it with a couple of inched of potting soil.  The plopped the money tree inside and filled the rest of the pot with potting soil.  It’s been about a week sitting in my sun room and the leaves on it are blooming ever so quickly!